Tag: kristin morris

CAW presents INSIDE

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On March 17, 2017, CAW opened their exhibition season with INSIDE, at the Cultural Art Center.  INSIDE the first part of duo exhibition, asked the artists to reflect on the multiple meanings of interior spaces through their own lens.   Beginning June 28, 2017, CAW will finish the artistic conversation started in Columbus with their first ever exhibition outside of the city. OUTSIDE will be on view at the Schnormeier Gallery in Mount Vernon, Ohio. This exhibition will consist of partner works that reveal the exterior of the theme each artist began in their work for INSIDE at the Cultural Arts Center.

 

Every CAW exhibition is a unique opportunity for our artists to explore new themes and push the boundaries of their chosen media. Here we highlight just a few artworks out of many incredible pieces from our 35 participating artists.

Megan Evers’s painted homage to bees titled Home is both commanding and delightful. Evers normally utilizes odd shaped canvases but she opts for hexagonal honeycomb pattern within a rectangular canvas. Kristin Morris’s Lizard in Boy Suit is a sublime combination of the grotesque, tongue in cheek humor and technical facility. Lastly, Melinda Sabo’s The Guide invites us to contemplate spiritual and even mystical concepts of one’s interior self.

Lizard in Boy Suit by Kristin Morris
Lizard in Boy Suit by Kristin Morris

The exhibit ends on April 15th. Do yourself a favor and check out these works live and in person. Then make sure you mark your calendars for the second installment of this exhibition OUTSIDE at the Schnormeier Gallery, opening reception July 7th.

For more information about INSIDE at the Cultural Arts Center, visit their website http://www.culturalartscenteronline.org

Talking about the third dimension with CAW member Kristin Morris

KMorris_PortraitThe wheels are always turning in the artistic mind of Kristin Morris. Her studio is full of pieces and parts she has culled from garage sales, flea markets and thrift stores. These wooden parts may be the base for a sculpture or integrated into the spine of a skeleton. Working in three dimensions is primary to her practice, and she deftly experiments with different sculpting materials and assemblage. Kristin’s mother is a potter and her father is a geologist so it’s only natural that the process and rigor needed in both of those fields is apparent in her work. Her sculptures skirt the line between dark and light, as well as playful and more serious. Her home studio is full of inspiring projects all on the cusp of coming to life.

 

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Installation for the exhibition Remnants by Kristin Morris (Photo credit: Caroline Kraus)


You created a school of fish that included found objects embedded within their ceramic bodies for Remnants. What was the most challenging part of that project?

The most challenging part of the Remnants project was figuring out the best way to hang the fish. I had some good ideas about the styles, types of fish, and found objects that I wanted to use – which I think worked out fairly well – but I’m still finding my way with ceramic techniques. I had some help with technical issues from Eric Raush, my ceramics teacher at the Cultural Arts Center.

How did you get your start in sculpture? What attracted you to working in three dimensions? 

I have been making things in clay since I was about 5 or 6 years old when I made little snakes to bring to art and craft shows. My mom is a potter who has done fairs my whole life, and I wanted something to sell, too. I have always loved clay because I grew up around it and I love the feel of it in my hands. It can be manipulated into any form or shape you desire – the possibilities are endless!  When I was little I had a sandbox in the backyard and I had more fun making “mud pies” in the dirt outside of the sandbox than in the sandbox!

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You created a school of fish that included found objects embedded within their ceramic bodies for Remnants. What was the most challenging part of that project?

The most challenging part of the Remnants project was figuring out the best way to hang the fish. I had some good ideas about the styles, types of fish, and found objects that I wanted to use – which I think worked out fairly well – but I’m still finding my way with ceramic techniques. I had some help with technical issues from Eric Raush, my ceramics teacher at the Cultural Arts Center.

How did you get your start in sculpture? What attracted you to working in three dimensions? 

I have been making things in clay since I was about 5 or 6 years old when I made little snakes to bring to art and craft shows. My mom is a potter who has done fairs my whole life, and I wanted something to sell, too. I have always loved clay because I grew up around it and I love the feel of it in my hands. It can be manipulated into any form or shape you desire – the possibilities are endless!  When I was little I had a sandbox in the backyard and I had more fun making “mud pies” in the dirt outside of the sandbox than in the sandbox!

After studying studio art, you continued your studies in 3D illustration at CCAD. How would you define that way of working?

After I graduated from college, I saw the annual Student Show at CCAD and was immediately drawn to the 3D Illustration work in the exhibit. I signed up for 3D Illustration and took it every semester that I was there. I learned to make molds, work in resins, foam and latex, and was invited to spend a summer working with my teacher – Mark Hazelrig – and 8 students sculpting characters for an amusement park haunted house. While in the class we also made a life size “chess set” of Alice In Wonderland vs. The Wizard Of Oz and sculptures of Roman gods on columns – all out of foam and latex. I had a great experience in that class and learned a lot of valuable skills that helped me later on working for a company making figures and props for haunted houses and an effects studio constructing a ride for a large water park out west.

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You are very prolific, working on several projects all at once. Is this always how you work? 

I’m always working on several things at once. I get bored doing the same thing for a long time if I don’t mix it up a little bit! I love to sculpt more than anything- but I also love to paint my sculptures. I go back and forth between these two things a lot!

You took a workshop with the sculptor, Janis Mars Wunderlich last year. What was your biggest takeaway from this experience? 

I learned some sculpting techniques from Janis, and she also talked a lot about glazes and underglazes.  Unfortunately I didn’t spend as much time listening to this part because I paint all of my sculptures with acrylics.  It was great to go in every day and see what everyone else was doing and most amazing to watch her sculpt and just see the way she approaches each piece. I’m in awe of her knowledge of clay and her active imagination!  I always thought her work was so strange but when I actually heard her talk about it – it really made a lot of sense. I could see where the stories and ideas found their way into her work! I also really enjoyed visiting her studio (at her house) and seeing where everything comes to life.

You have said that Walter Herrmann describes your work as “playfully macabre.” Why is this a fitting description? How do you describe your work? 

I think “playfully macabre” is a perfect description of my work! It is somewhat edgy, dark, scary, and weird, but it has a lighter side to it – a fun side. It’s not malicious or gruesome or mean-spirited in any way. I think one of the worst things to me is when someone walks up at a show and says “Oh, it’s so cute!”  That drives me crazy!  I admit, I have made some cute things, and I still do, but there is a time and place for that. The majority of my work is not on the cute side. More often than not people say to me it reminds them of Tim Burton – which I take as a compliment.

A sculpture of a tortoise created by Kristin Morris at a workshop led by Janis Mars Wunderlich at the Cultural Arts Center
A sculpture of a tortoise created by Kristin Morris at a workshop led by Janis Mars Wunderlich at the Cultural Arts Center

 

You work in a variety of 3D mediums, including clay, apoxie sculpt, latex and more. What determines the material for a given project? 

The given material for a project depends on what its use will be. I used to make latex hand puppets but there wasn’t a big market for those. Apoxie Sculpt is one of my favorite mediums to work with but it has a faster set-up time so sometimes I will use Super Sculpey instead. For instance, if I am working on a face that could take a while. Apoxie sculpt is heavier too, so if you’re doing something light it’s not the best option.  However, it’s really strong and it’s self-hardening – no oven or kiln needed – which is great!  It’s awesome for working with found objects and adhering things together when glues just won’t do. I love stoneware clay (pottery clay) – I am developing more skills as I continue working with it.

Since you work in so many materials, how do you organize your home studio spaces?

I have a downstairs studio in my basement for stoneware clay and painting; in my studio/computer room upstairs I have a large table I use for other types of clay sculpting such as Apoxie Sculpt, Super Sculpey, and materials that aren’t messy.

What project is next for you? 

Up next I will be in the Upper Arlington Labor Day Arts Festival in September. In October, I will be a featured artist at the Oakland Nursery Gift Shop in New Albany (Johnstown Rd.) during the Fall Festival weekend. In October of 2016 I will be in a show with Debbie Loffing and Kate Morgan at the Vanderelli Room.