Mollie Hannon

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

 

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

Remnants of Nature (Opossum)

digital photography

14” x 20”

 

mollie-hannon-caw-columbus-remnants-osu-urban-arts-space-creative-arts-of-women
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

Remnants of Nature (Rabbit)

digital photography

14” x 20”

 

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

Remnants of Nature (Raccoon)

digital photography

14” x 20”

 


 

Bio

Mollie Hannon was given her first camera at 8 years old and fell in love. She began studying photography 1994 as a student at The Ohio State University. Later she studied under the tutelage of internationally renowned commercial photographers in London, England. Since 2006, Mollie has had a solo exhibition and has participated in many group shows throughout Columbus and nationwide.

Mollie takes pictures of her surroundings (both internal and external) and tries to portray the world as she sees it. People, places and moments are all filled with a life; a visual energy that is visible yet often goes unnoticed. Connecting with that life through both digital and traditional photography mediums allows her to extend the viewing time of individual moments, presenting a pause to the audience. Experimentation with film and paper is essential in her work.

 


 

Statement

I take photographs because I like stories. Each piece I create comes from an attempt to capture a moment, something personal within the subject or myself. My photographs are more than pictures to look at. They have texture, emotion. I want to evoke a response.

Since I was a little girl, the dead animals on the side of the road have intrigued me. Looking back it seems we only passed them on the side of the highway, lost and unlucky. Today, we see animals not only on the highways, but busy roadways and residential streets. It’s not a matter of being lost or unlucky, but rather a human invasion over animal space.

In my work “Remnants of Nature”, I explore the relationship of our over developed civilization and its effect on nature and animal habitats. By getting up close to my subjects I am harshly confronted by the sadness and pain of human actions. I tend to be literal with my photos and the very graphic nature of how each subject is represented allows the audience to see, with detail what we usually choose to avoid. I wanted to give these creatures a chance to be something more than discarded objects we avert our eyes from and drive around quickly. I wanted them to be more than something unpleasant and have that small twinge in our hearts last longer than a brief moment. My hope is that we can all pause for a moment and wonder if our needs and constant consumption is worth it.

I used recycled materials in the presentation of this series. Homage to my fallen subjects, I am aware of my actions and their direct impact on the lives of animals, even at this small scale.