Juna Amano

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

State of Diffusion

wood, audio tape, hooks, monofilament

8’ x 23” x 23”

 

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

Diffuser 263

mixed media on paper

23” x 21”

 

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

Diffuser 264

mixed media on paper

23” x 21”

 


 

Bio

Juna Amano is a conceptual artist who works in installation, drawing and performance. She has a professional and academic background in film. She received her BFA from Otis College of Art and Design. In her practice, she investigates the fluidity of memory and the place of in-between. Past exhibition venues include: 18th Street Arts Center, LA><ART, LAX Airport, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Museum of Latin American Art in Los Angeles and Lapnet Ship in Tokyo, Japan. Performance venues include: MOCA and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions in Los Angeles. Screening venues include: San Francisco International Lesbian & Gay Film Festival and New York Film Expo. She was awarded a residency fellowship at Wassaic Project in New York.
 


 

Statement

I first created a work with audio cassette tapes from personal archives while I was at a residency in Wassaic in upstate NY. I made a screen with a wood frame and magnetic tape. It stood independently with a support. It was a site-specific installation. I placed the screen in various places in rural landscape. Because the material is not weather-resistant, the installation was meant to be temporary and transient. I intended to create the contrast between personal artifact and nature. A human-made object becomes a gauge with which to measure the nature with no obvious definition. Because of two-dimensionality of the screen, the object was designed to be seen from particular viewpoints. Here the screen became a symbolic window that allows us to observe the landscape through a new frame. Finally, I am interested in a transitional space or a place of “in-between”. The screen functioned as a passageway to contemplate the possibility of the other side.

The new piece is a development of my previous work. The new work is also site-specific, but in a much more controlled setting of a gallery. For this project, I was able to make a more complex structure. I made ten screens with wood and tapes and hung them from a ceiling in an arrangement. The three-dimensional structure invites viewers to walk around and view it from multiple viewpoints. I encourage them to touch the piece. Whether it is a personal memory or an obsolete technology, by adopting part of my history and replacing its original form and purpose, I create a space of reflection where viewers re-frame their own remnants of the past and make them alive in the present tense. As the title State of Diffusion suggests, I hope that pieces of our memory disperse and circulate as much as they are filtered through and become vague. On the wall, there will be drawings referencing the history and content of audio tapes.