J Clark

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

Nathan Kelly’s Incandescent Lamp Lighter 

photo transfer on wood

11” x 27” x1”

 

The Vociferation of the Oak Street Railway

photo transfer on wood

9.5” x 27” x 2”

 

Missing Circa

photo transfer on wood

12” x 12” x 2”

 

Delineate 

photo transfer on wood

13” x 6” x 2”

 

Monsieur Inoccupée

photo transfer on wood

8” x 15” x 2”

 

Remanior

photo transfer on wood

12” x 12” x 2”

 

Aerial Love Affair

photo transfer on wood

17” x 4.5” x 2”

 

Oxidation of the Unbridled

photo on wood

9” x 7”

 

Vestige

photo transfer on wood

9” x 15.5” x 3”

 


 

Bio

At 33 years old, J has had a different address to match every year of life and then some. With at least 44 different addresses, it’s hard to know where to call home. Moving repeatedly, she found herself staring out the window of a U-Haul, giddy with excitement at each new city her family approached.

The skyline of any city excited the very core of her: the appeal of something new, yet so historically rich, to explore. The call of the mysterious, from a shadowy alley beckoning her to come get lost and the sky scrapers with a thousand internal voices telling their stories at once from their lit windows to the confusion of jumbled power lines, old churches, and abandoned buildings, all with stories to tell for those willing to listen.

As an adult, the nomad way of life didn’t stop until she settled in Columbus. Then moving to Short North and becoming a full-time foot traveler allowed her to have a new perspective. The brick streets, alleys, buildings and pocket parks seemed to whisper wanderlustful sweet nothings to her. She reached for her iPhone and became changed by getting lost in her neighborhood.

 


 

statement

Remnants, for me, focuses on the theme of turn of the century, abandoned buildings that are remnants of a city’s heart and soul. Progressively, these buildings have deteriorated over the decades. Once essential, secure beacons of the community; structures of brick, wood, metal, & glass have succumb to time, a city’s development, or left functionless through the course of evolution. Cast off on the outskirts of towns or forgotten in the middle of a booming metropolis; gradually these structures are mere vestiges of their former life.

I was granted permission to photograph two of the most swoon-worthy historical buildings in Columbus, the Trolley Barn & Municipal Light Plant. Using an iPhone, I captured semblances of these declining properties. Transferring the photographic images onto remnant wood from these locations, I used a matte gel medium. To devise a comprehensive motif of wholeness, I gathered wood, bricks, screws, train spikes, fence posts, coal, metal fixtures, identification plates, hold tags, and glass jars, to weave together a story with traces of the structures.

Encompassing these elements of these buildings into my art, I hope to convey the intrinsic qualities these remnants give to our cities and homes. Rusted, broken, and crumbling, what is lost from the original if we are left with fragments? Is the whole somehow still intact? Is the soul of a city lost or captured through redevelopment? What is the worth of what remains? Through the use of remnant materials of unoccupied structures, I hope importance will be granted once again to the origin of a city.