Amy Leibrand

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

 

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

i can’t shake the goosebumps

image transfer on wood panel; nails; thread/yarn; mannequin hand; paper scrap

24″ x 18″ x 6″

 

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

there was mind control involved

image transfer on wood panel; decorative tin cover; thread/yarn; mannequin hand; skeleton key; area under tin cover illuminates from behind (not visible in bright light)

24″ x 18″ x 6″

 

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

a nod to escape

image transfer on perforated wood panel; thread/yarn; area under perforation illuminates from behind (not visible in bright light)

24″ x 18″ x 2″

 

Photo credit: Caroline Kraus
Photo credit: Caroline Kraus

pretty vs. ugly

image transfers on wood panels; thread/yarn; vintage photo frames

24″ x 42″ x 3″

 


 

Bio

Amy Leibrand is an image-based conceptual artist. Her work has gained international attention through exhibits in Paris, Berlin, London and major U.S. cities, and through publication in VICE magazine, the New York Times, LensCulture and others. She was featured on Columbus’ Emmy-winning PBS program Broad & High, which re-aired in major markets nationwide. Amy is on the CAW Steering Committee, and is an Administrator for the Art and Artists Of, LLC. She is a research scientist by profession and an artist by passion. More of her work can be viewed at www.thisspaceisrented.com.

 


 

Statement

Psychologists describe the security blanket as a “comfort object” used to provide psychological support, especially in unusual or stressful situations. The security blanket can also be a shield, a thing children hide under when they want to disappear. But, the security blanket provides a false sense of security, as we are equally vulnerable with or without it.

The thread and yarn used in this series is from my childhood blanket, which I slept with until my early twenties. For this project, I unraveled the blanket entirely. During this process, I noticed my increased heart rate, which served as a reminder of the child-teen-young adult I once was under my blanket, clinging and longing for comfort.

The women in these portraits are missing their identifiable facial features. They are the Every-Woman; they represent all of us. The various masks we wear — both literal (e.g., makeup) and figurative (e.g., acting tough) — are our own forms of the security blanket. These masks may illuminate and penetrate, transform us from one life role to another, or seemingly shield us from fear. Regardless of their purpose, the various masks we wear illustrate our ability to adapt and cope as humans.